People

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Whatever Happened to Birkett Davenport Fry?

    Birkett Davenport Fry wasn’t very good at math. In fact, a failing grade in that subject led to his early dismissal from the U.S. Military Academy, denying him a chance to graduate with the famed West Point class of 1846. Fry’s...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Nancy Hill—Civil War Nurse, Pioneering Doctor

    Nurse Nancy Hill’s reputation for sound judgment and bravery began in the chaotic days immediately following the Battle of the Wilderness in early May 1864. Two hundred fifty wounded soldiers were transported  by way of Aquia Creek...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    What Made This First Homebuilt Airplane So Dangerous?

    History’s first homebuilt entrepreneur named his aircraft after an insect. By the mid-1920s aviation was no longer solely the province of the professional. The man (and woman) on the street desperately wanted to get in on it....

  • World War II Magazine

    Joe Boyd’s Battle for Peace

    Joe Boyd’s war against fascism began long before the first shots of World War II were fired. A Belfast milkman in the years between the wars, Boyd had been active in the Fabian Society for some time. The society had been formed in Great...

  • World War II Magazine

    One Man’s War: Donald Love

    NAME: Donald Love DATE ENTERED SERVICE: January 6, 1936 CAMPAIGNS: Operation Market-Garden DECORATIONS: 1939-45 Star, Aircrew Europe Star with France & Germany clasp, Defense Medal, War Medal The ground phase of Operation Market-Garden...

  • World War II Magazine

    Secretary to a Master Spy

    My career in “espionage” began with my friend Marianne, who worked at the German Embassy in Tokyo. Given that the wartime situation made it difficult for the embassy to get qualified typists from Germany, she told the employment...

  • World War II Magazine

    The ‘Battle Baby’ Magazine Born in Tokyo

    General Douglas MacArthur had not even entered the city when Tokyo was declared off limits to war correspondents in September 1945. To enforce the edict, roadblocks were set up and manned by grizzled veterans of the 1st Cavalry and 11th...

  • World War II, World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- February 2006

    CLARIFICATION ON MCCAULEY I recently received the October 2005 issue of World War II Magazine that contained the memoir “In Enemy Hands,” which was written by my late husband Dr. Charles McCauley. Although in general I was very pleased...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letter from the Editor- February 2006

    The enormity of the crime defies comprehension. In all the long sordid history of man’s inhumanity to man, the Holocaust stands out as the most barbaric. Fortunately, in the 60-plus years since it began, Germany’s descent into madness...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Poet of the Blitz

    On a late summer night in September 1940, millions of Americans sat near their radios mesmerized by the penetrating voice that brought a distant war into their living rooms. “Off to my left, far away in the distance, I can see just that...

  • World War II Magazine

    One Man’s War: William Eaton

    NAME: William Eaton DATE ENTERED SERVICE: 1941 CAMPAIGNS: Pacific Raids—1942, Marshall Islands, Western New Guinea, Leyte Operations, Luzon Operations, Iwo Jima Operations DECORATIONS: Navy Good Conduct Medal, American Defense Medal,...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters from Readers- March 2006

    GREETINGS FROM GUAM I deeply apologize for my long delay in letting you know that I received the magazine with your article on the George Ray Tweed story you sent me (“Undercover,” June 2005). You did a great job. It was well written,...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Forgotten Survivors

    Forgotten Survivors: Polish Christians Remember the Nazi Occupation edited by Richard C. Lukas; University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, 2004, $29.95. Throughout his career, Richard Lukas has documented the persecution of Polish Christians by...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Pilot’s War on the Ground

    “Major Underwood?” the sergeant inquired of the officer sitting in the jeep outside IX Corps headquarters. The relentless pounding of Allied artillery against German forces in the Metz pocket echoed in the distance. “You found...

  • World War II Magazine

    Escaped POW’s Chinese Odyssey

    Upon breaking out of his second Japanese prison after almost three years of captivity, Lt. Cmdr. Columbus Darwin Smith crossed more than 1,300 miles of enemy-held territory in a desperate bid for freedom. On November 28, 1941, Rear Admiral...

  • World War II Magazine

    Above, Beyond, and Forgotten

    Despite his unrivaled combat record over five days in 1945, Llewellyn M. Chilson was denied his country’s highest honor. Llewellyn M. Chilson should be a household name—President Harry S. Truman thought so. At a White House ceremony on...