Naval History

  • World War II Magazine

    Pearl Harbor Avenged

    At the January 1942 Battle of Balikpapan, the four stalwart destroyers of Division 59 demonstrated that there was still plenty of fight left in the U.S. Navy. In the days and weeks following the raid on Pearl Harbor, the armed forces of...

  • World War II Magazine

    Battle with No Name

    During a perilous passage across the Mediterranean to deliver supplies to their hard–pressed forces in Tunisia, Italian torpedo boats engaged in a David–and-Goliath confrontation with the Royal Navy. Fifteen miles southwest of...

  • World War II Magazine

    Eyes of the Imperial Fleet

    At 5 in the morning on December 7, 1941, the Japanese heavy cruisers Chikuma and Tone catapulted one floatplane each into the sky. Their mission was to make a last weather reconnaissance around the target for the six aircraft carriers of...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Royal Navy’s Revenge

    In the final days of World War II, the Royal Navy achieved a victory over the Imperial Japanese Navy that restored some measure of the prestige that it had lost early in the war. Driven from the waters of Southeast Asia by a resolute...

  • World War II Magazine

    Dreadnaught’s Fiery Finale

    As the shells from Rear Adm. Jesse Oldendorf’s battleships fell upon Vice Adm. Shoji Nishimura’s dreadnoughts attempting to force a passage of Surigao Strait, an era of naval warfare came to a thunderous end. For much of the Pacific...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Clash of the Carriers

    Clash of the Carriers: The True Story of the Marianas Turkey Shoot of World War II by Barrett Tillman, New American Library, New York, 2005, $24.95. It is a truism to say that there are two kinds of military history. “Popular history”...

  • World War II Magazine

    Armament: France’s ‘Fleet in Being’

    Like the United States and Great Britain, France was an early proponent of naval aviation. In 1912, in fact, the French navy modified the old cruiser Foudre into a seaplane depot ship. The following year a hangar was added, transforming...

  • World War II Magazine

    Sailing into the Unknown

    Choosing the uncertainty of an epic journey across 2,000 miles of enemy-controlled ocean rather than the ignominy of surrender, Lt. Cmdr. Jack Morrill and the crew of USS Quail escaped from the Philippines in a fragile 36-foot motor...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Power at Sea

    Power at Sea (three volumes), 1: The Age of Navalism, 1890-1918; 2: The Breaking Storm, 1919-1945; 3: A Violent Peace, 1946-2006 Lisle A. Rose, (University of Missouri Press, 2006), $49.95, $59.95, $49.95 ($19.95 each in paperback). Naval...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Audacious Cruise of the Emden

    A daring German cruiser captain wreaked havoc on Allied shipping in the Indian Ocean during the early months of World War I. In the early years of the twentieth century, Kaiser Wilhelm II headquartered his East Asia Squadron in the port...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: The river patrol boat was the backbone of the Brown Water...

    The guerrilla nature of warfare in Vietnam required the U.S. Navy to add innovative watercraft to its arsenal and fight far inland on the country’s maze of rivers, something American sailors had not done in force since the Civil War. Up...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Special Agent, Vietnam

    Special Agent, Vietnam: A Naval Intelligence Memoir by Douglas H. Hubbard Jr. Potomac Books, Washington, D.C., 2006, hardcover $26.95. Hubbard served three tours in Vietnam as a Naval Intelligence Service (NIS) officer. His experience,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Upshur did yeoman service carrying thousands of GIs to Vietnam

    When its keel was laid on September 1, 1949, the USS President Hayes had a bright future ahead of it, peacefully cruising the globe and transporting passengers and cargo to exotic ports of call. However, just like so many of the hundreds...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Blockade in Name Only

    The Union blockade of Rebel ports was porous, inadequate and easily penetrated throughout the entire war. The Civil War was only four months old, but Union Navy officer Lewis H.West was quite sure the Federal blockade of Southern ports was...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Reviews: John Rodgers, Charles Stewart, and Stephen Decatur

    Commodore John Rodgers: Paragon of the Early American Navy by John H. Schroeder, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, 2006, $59.95. A Call to the Sea: Captain Charles Stewart of the USS Constitution by Claude Berube and John Rodgaard,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Pistols at Ten Paces

    Stephen Decatur was only a teenager when he wrapped his arms around a fellow midshipman who was too injured to raise his pistol or even stand to help hm continue a duel. The midshipman had faced two opponents and was wounded by both, but...