Military Technology

  • World War II Magazine

    The Mortar-Equipped Landing Craft

    On February 19, 1945, two United States Marine Corps divisions landed on the sulfurous shores of Iwo Jima. As was customary, prior to the actual landings, the small 7.5-square-mile island received a heavy preparatory bombardment from the...

  • World War II Magazine

    The M-1 75mm Pack Howitzer

    Waves of United States Marines moved toward their landing beaches on the tiny volcanic island of Iwo Jima in February 1945. Aboard their LVTs (landing vehicles, tracked), the more experienced among them hunkered down as low as they could...

  • World War II Magazine

    Armored Debut on the Road to Damortis

    The subsequent exploits of U.S. armored forces during World War II have overshadowed the first action involving American tankers. The United States’ first World War II tank versus tank engagement was no grand, dashing maneuver on the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Able Dog: Was the AD Skyraider the Best Attack Bomber Ever Built?

    The Douglas AD Skyraider wasn't pretty, but its pilots and maintenance crews dubbed it the Able Dog because of its handling and dependability. Some still regard it as "the best airplane ever made for close-in attack."...

  • World War II Magazine

    Scaring Them to Death: The BAR

    On the morning of June 6, 1944, a detachment of 200 U.S. Army Rangers approached the coast of Normandy and prepared to carry out the unenviable mission of scaling a perpendicular cliff behind the beach and silencing a battery of 155mm...

  • World War II Magazine

    Armament: The Lost KVs

    Did the KV-85 heavy and T-34/85 medium tanks, which entered service in the war on the Russian Front, show up around the beginning of 1943 or much later at the start of 1944? Marshal Georgi Zhukov boasted in his memoirs, “By the summer of...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Letters to Readers- August 2006

    THE BEETLE IN BATTLE I particularly enjoyed Ryan Lee Price’s article “The Beetle in Battle” in your May 2006 issue. I hadn’t realized before that the Volkswagen and Kübelwagen were so closely related. Furthermore, it never...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: German Remote-Controlled Vehicles of World War II

    On the outer wall of St. John’s Cathedral in the Stare Miasto, Warsaw’s Old Town, a peculiar memorial exists in the form of a miniature caterpillar track. This is a relic from some of the most unusual additions to Germany’s World War...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: F-111

    During the 1950s, the United States developed the most technically advanced military aircraft the world had ever known. No country dared to challenge directly its military superiority, even the Soviet Union. How then could its air power...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: The river patrol boat was the backbone of the Brown Water...

    The guerrilla nature of warfare in Vietnam required the U.S. Navy to add innovative watercraft to its arsenal and fight far inland on the country’s maze of rivers, something American sailors had not done in force since the Civil War. Up...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: M-551 Sheridan

    The light tank was ill-suited to Vietnam’s climate and environment, but with 152mm guns and modifications it still served well. East of Tay Ninh City a soldier sat in his listening post, darkness all around. His unit, Troop A, 3rd...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    North Vietnam’s light anti-aircraft artillery

    The armament downed more American planes and helicopters than all other air defense weapons combined. American airmen flying over North Vietnam faced one of the most intensive and highly developed air defense systems in history. Although...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Arsenal: The T-54 Tank

    One of the defining symbols of the endgame of the Vietnam War. The Vietnam War was over. April 30, 1975, marks the end of a conflict that had begun some 30 years earlier with the conclusion of World War II. It had been a long, bloody...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Civil War Cosmopolitan and Joslyn Carbines

    In 1861, the U.S. Army counted 4,076 muzzleloading and breechloading carbines in its inventory. While that was plenty for peacetime use, it was far fewer than needed by the rapidly growing Union Army. Some of those weapons were well-made...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Biggest Gun in the World

    In 1918 the Germans hit Paris from 68 miles away with 330-pound artillery shells fired by a mysterious gargantuan cannon. At 7:15 am on March 23, 1918, Parisians near Number 6 Quai de Seine, in the northeastern part of the city, were...

  • Military History Magazine

    How the U.S. Got Nazi Germany’s Best Scientists

    Nazi Germany held some of the greatest scientific minds. And many of them were in the U.S. World War II was as good as over in Europe and the rubble of Berlin and Dresden was still smoking as American, Soviet and British armies ransacked...