Military History

  • American History Magazine

    De Grasse to the Rescue at Yorktown

    A surprise tactical move by the pride of the French royal navy trapped 8,000 British soldiers and sailors on the Virginia Peninsula, brought down a government in London—and helped win the American Revolution. When news of the British...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Hurtling Toward the End

    The April 6, 1865, Battle of Sailor’s Creek constituted one of the darkest days in the army of northern Virginia’s history. It had been one disaster after another for General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia that first...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    “Reconsider, Hell!”

    Phil Sheridan’s single-minded pursuit of victory left a more cautious union general ruined after the battle of five forks. The Battle of Five Forks had been brilliantly won. Nevertheless, Major General Philip H. Sheridan was  angry....

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Bentonville: Last Chance to Stop Sherman

    With only 20,000 men hastily scraped together, Joseph Johnston tackled two federal corps, and lost. To the weary troops of General Joseph E. Johnston’s command occupying the fresh breastworks in the  North Carolina woods south of...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Columbia: God’s Will Or Yankee Vengeance?

    During the last weeks of the war, South Carolina’s capital paid a bitter price for being the cradle of secession. Major General William T. Sherman’s march to the Sea drew to a close during the last weeks of  1864, bringing an end...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Early Days- Martin A. Haynes

    The war’s first large land battle began with both sides confident of quick victory. But as one Union participant remembered in 1865, few things in wartime are really as they first appear. About a mile beyond was the little village of...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Southern Horse

    Bravery and sacrifice weren’t exclusive to the two-legged soldier. Traveller, Little Sorrel, gallant charges of plumed cavaliers: This is the legend of Southern horses. The reality, however, was half-starved plodding animals pulling tons...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The Moral Regiment at the Battle of Vicksburg

    A Union regiment enough, an Illinois unit that fought at Vicksburg was known as the “Moral Regiment”(or “Teachers Regiment”). However, as the diary of Sergeant composed only of men with high moral character? Oddly William Murray...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Bluegrass State Battleground

    Events pressed hard upon Confederate Major General Leonidas Polk in the late summer of 1861. As commander of defenses on the lower Mississippi River from the Tennessee-Kentucky border to Louisiana, Polk in confronted momentous decisions....

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Four Years in the Stonewall Brigade

    Four Years in the Stonewall Brigade Virginian John O. Casler was the quintessential anti-Confederate hero. His service in the famous Stonewall Brigade was distinguished by his uncanny ability to evade the restrictions of military life....

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The Road to Appomattox

    At the beginning General Robert E. Lee decided to evacuate his army from the of April 1865, Richmond-Petersburg front. A number of factors led to his decision. These included the failed assault on Fort Stedman, the approach of Major...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Examining the Appomattox Parole

    We “hung upon Lee’s rear like a BloodHound after his Victim,” wrote a New York infantryman about those fateful days in the spring of 1865. It was no exaggeration, for during the numbing Confederate retreat, Grant’s troops had shown...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    The Deadliest Shot: The Doomed White River Expedition

    An ironclad vessel versus a poorly manned land battery? It seemed so easy. Secure in an iron cocoon, a crew could simply move in close and shower the target with shot and shell. Commander Augustus Kilty of USS Mound City stood confidently...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Dead Horses in Sheridan’s Ashes

    William Daniel Cabell of Norwood, Virginia, served the Confederacy as the captain of the New Market Home Guard from 1861-65. During this time New Market, a village near the Tye River’s entrance to the James  River, was renamed...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Letters from Readers- April 2006

    In Meade’s Defense “The Lost Opportunity of Gettysburg” (December 2005) tells of President Abraham Lincoln’s disappointment about General George Meade’s failure to destroy General Lee’s army after that battle, but when did the...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Who Fired The Fatal Shot?

    An intriguing postscript to the story of Major General Leonidas Polk’s death is the somewhat unseemly debate that has raged through the years over which Federal battery, and even which individual, was responsible for the bombardment that...